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The Extraordinary Business Book Club

Alison Jones, publisher and book coach, explores business books from both a writer's and a reader's perspective. Interviews with authors, publishers, business leaders, entrepreneurs, tech wizards, social media strategists, PR and marketing experts and others involved in helping businesses tell their story effectively.
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Now displaying: September, 2017
Sep 25, 2017

My personal favourite moments from the last 9 episodes of The Extraordinary Business Book Club. It's an incredible selection:

  • Daniel Priestley (Key Person of Influence) on making the book work with the business
  • Warren Knight (Think #Digital First) on what it means to be in control of publishing your book
  • Orna Ross (Head of ALLi, the Alliance of Independent Authors) on making the most of your publishing options
  • Sara Kelly (journalist and academic) on why we're all entrepreneurs now
  • Antony Mayfield (Brilliant Noise) on why small is beautiful when it comes to marketing
  • Bridget Shine (CEO of the Independent Publishers Group) on what it means to publish with a small independent press
  • Matt Watkinson (The Grid) on the big press experience and why it's OK if you're finding it hard to write your book
  • Pam Didner (Global Content Marketing) on why writing is her extreme sport of choice
  • Amanda Setili (Fearless Growth) on how not taking yourself too seriously can seriously improve your writing.

Make a cup of tea and settle down. Heck, grab a biscuit too.

 

Sep 18, 2017

Antony Mayfield runs marketing and communications agency Brilliant Noise, helping some of the biggest brands in the world transform their approach to getting their message out. He's got some fascinating stuff to say about how advertising and marketing are changing, and what it means to be digitally literate, with tips that work for microbusinesses as well as multinationals (in fact he says the reason he works with the big companies is that they need more help getting this right!). 

But he also talks about Brilliant Noise's own approach to marketing, and particularly the way they create and use books within the company. 

'Those books are like little avatars, little bits of you that you sent out into the world and they've got a life of their own and they're going round telling people what you think.'

A fascinating, inspiring conversation with one of the world's leading thinkers in digital marketing. 

Sep 11, 2017

'I'm actually shocked at what writing now means to me relative to what it would have meant before I wrote two books. I used to dread writing... now it's a way to structure my learning, it's a place to put my creativity. It's a place to create a sense of intellectual flow in my life.'

Amanda Setili runs a consulting business, and she very deliberately uses her books to explore what fascinates her and what she loves to work on in order to attract the clients she's most interested in working with. In this interview she reveals how she goes about creating the models and tools that accompany her books, and how she learned to shift from dry, technical writing to a more creative, story-led approach. 

This is an episode full of practical, usable insights for anyone wanting to make their book not only more useful to read, but more enjoyable to write. 

Sep 4, 2017

Bridget Shine, CEO of the Independent Publishers Guild in the UK, is at the forefront of the revolution taking place in publishing today. In this week's episode we discuss what it means to be an independent publisher, and from the author's perspective, what it's like to be published by an independent publisher. The old rules and divisions are breaking down, and there are fantastic opportunities for those with the will and the energy to explore them.

She also has some great tips for approaching independent publishers, and advice for those considering setting up as publishers themselves. And if you get lost in the definitions - indie authors, independent publishers, partner publishing - she takes a reassuringly pragmatic and positive approach:

'The point about the IPG... is we're all about helping one another and supporting each other and if you start getting a bit too ground down by those definitions you would get stuck very easily. For us, it's about people sharing, it's about the spirit of independence.'

 

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